Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Revisiting Radiohead’s “Fitter Happier”
#1
Throughout our lives, there are media pieces that influence our thinking and shape our worldview, for better or for worse. I still recall the agony I felt as North American cities were bombed at the end of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, the rage of John The Savage in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World after he fell for the pleasures of the consumerist world outside his reservation, the pent-up anger Mersault released as he faced a priest who asked him to repent in Albert Camus’ The Stranger, and the misery of a family of Oklahomans who immigrate to California in John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath, for example.
Reply
#2
Music has also touched me in similar ways: The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds narrated the youth of countless of American teens since its release, Jane Birkin’s sighs of pleasure in “Je t’aime…moi non plus” along Serge Gainsbourg inspired me to read their intense love story, and the subject of this piece, Radiohead’s “Fitter Happier” interlude, reminded me of the rigid lifestyle patterns people in the West have adopted without much thinking. These patterns are endlessly repeated in this platform, under the assumption that they are holy advice to follow to be happy.
Reply
#3
(04-16-2019, 12:11 AM)shadowbrain Wrote: Music has also touched me in similar ways: The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds narrated the youth of countless of American teens since its release, Jane Birkin’s sighs of pleasure in “Je t’aime…moi non plus” along Serge Gainsbourg inspired me to read their intense love story, and the subject of this piece, Radiohead’s “Fitter Happier” interlude, reminded me of the rigid lifestyle patterns people in the West have adopted without much thinking. These patterns are endlessly repeated in this platform, under the assumption that they are holy advice to follow to be happy.

This song was released two decades ago, yet this pop advice to become a better human is just as popular — if not more — than back then. “Productivity and temperance” is the motto of our age, never mind that each person has individual needs that may not fit nicely with either of these concepts. The rewarding 9 to 5 career, the healthy diet, nuclear family, neurotypical demeanor, participation in the banking system, and emotional restraint with a hint of passion to simulate liveliness are heavily featured on Medium every day, reminding us that we’re all here to fulfill a similar function on Earth.
Reply
#4
The self improvement industry has diversified a lot since the 1990s — beyond Og Mandino and Paulo Coehlo, we have people who suggest completely shutting oneself off from the world in houses made of impeccable steel in the suburbs and those who, on the contrary, think a spiritual retreat in India or Sub-Saharan Africa will get rid of our Western sins and made us freer of whatever it is that makes us feel bad. Self improvement movements are as diverse as cookie flavors at the supermarket, though they tend to orbit still those same concepts Radiohead talked about in 1997.
Reply
#5
The “a pig on a cage on antibiotics” ending was meant to both parallel the complacency of the Western man and of a pig in an industrialized farm and call out the unhappiness that this complacency implies. Yorke mentioned he was inspired by Jonathan Coe’s What a Carve Up!, a novel that I will have to read at some point but seems to satirically criticize 1980s British life.
Reply
#6
(04-16-2019, 12:12 AM)shadowbrain Wrote: The “a pig on a cage on antibiotics” ending was meant to both parallel the complacency of the Western man and of a pig in an industrialized farm and call out the unhappiness that this complacency implies. Yorke mentioned he was inspired by Jonathan Coe’s What a Carve Up!, a novel that I will have to read at some point but seems to satirically criticize 1980s British life.

 For some people, a robotic voice simply listing a bunch of self help clichés does not amount to great creativity, and the monotony of life has been addressed for a long time, really, but I mentioned at the beginning that my choices are rather personal. The somber tone of this interlude made me feel the hollowness of modern life in a way few other songs or books have done before.
Reply
#7
Everything starts for a reason, and fitness is not any exception to the rule. Unless you have got a solid basis to begin, you won’t be ready to keep committed and follow through together with your resolutions. the nice news is that almost all of the motivation is mental. this implies you'll be able to really place an idea of action in situ which will take away all the obstacles standing between you and your fitness goals.

fitter healthier happier
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)