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Cement board mobile home skirting
#1
My wife's aunt gave us a book on shed building. "Sheds The Do-It-Yourself Guide for Backyard Builders" by David Stiles In it they talk about a post and skirt foundation, using cement board for the skirting, partially buried.Seems to be a neat idea and I haven't found it discussed anywhere.I don't think it serves a structural purpose, but it keeps the critters out and prevents the wind from blowing under the shed. I think it would work well for a cabin.
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#2
Cement fiber board, at least the Hardie brand, is water resistant not waterproof. If buried in the ground it will absorb moisture through that edge and eventually delaminate. If it freezes when moist that will hasten delamination. Hardie installation instructions state a minimum 2" clearance between the lower edge of the hardie product and a deck, for example.
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#3
(06-16-2019, 12:03 AM)shadowbrain Wrote: Cement fiber board, at least the Hardie brand, is water resistant not waterproof. If buried in the ground it will absorb moisture through that edge and eventually delaminate. If it freezes when moist that will hasten delamination. Hardie installation instructions state a minimum 2" clearance between the lower edge of the hardie product and a deck, for example.

If kept off the ground and painted it lasts darn near forever. I left a piece sitting with one edge on the ground to see what would happen. It sat through a summer and winter. The following spring it shows signs of separation for a distance of an inch or so up from the bottom edge. I could break it off with my fingers.
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#4
I assumed it would be more resistant to the elements. We've been trying to figure out a durable material for our skirting. We plan to conceal whatever we use with rocks from the property (probably just arranged/stacked, rather than actually building a wall.) What would you recommend that would last a long time, not be compromised by temperature change/moisture, be strong enough to have large rocks leaning against it, and be reasonably priced? What a list of requirements, eh? Oh yeah- and be critter-resistant?
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#5
(06-16-2019, 12:04 AM)matcherelves Wrote: I assumed it would be more resistant to the elements. We've been trying to figure out a durable material for our skirting. We plan to conceal whatever we use with rocks from the property (probably just arranged/stacked, rather than actually building a wall.) What would you recommend that would last a long time, not be compromised by temperature change/moisture, be strong enough to have large rocks leaning against it, and be reasonably priced? What a list of requirements, eh? Oh yeah- and be critter-resistant?



We were originally planned on leaving the underside open. The floor is insulated and the joist underside sheeted in plywood. However since last years nearby big wildfire and talking with many fire fighter crews and chiefs we decided to skirt. Even though the surrounding ground is free from most vegetation the fire fighters explained the danger could be from firebrands blowing in if a fire came through or close. Being at the top of a ridge there could possibly be quite a wind coming up the slope.
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#6
We decided to go with metal roofing panels; ribbing running vertical. I went around the perimeter measuring the varying vertical distances required. The roofing company cut the panels to my specs. I'll be framing with PT lumber with the bottom rail (call this the bottom "plate") being a 2x4 on edge following the contour of the ground. The top plate will be screwed to the underside of the floor framing. Vertical "studs" inserted between the upper and bottom 2x4 at spacing appropriate to the metal panels. One or two on each long side will be hinged for access. Vent screening and expanded steel will be used for ventilation.
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